Canadian period

Canadian period

For the first time in its short history, Canada had to ensure its own defence. The Minister of Militia and Defence decided to create two permanent batteries reporting to the Royal Canadian Artillery: Battery A and Battery B. An artillery school opened in the citadel in 1871 to train men for military life. A few years later, a cavalry school followed. La Citadelle became a place of learning.

Lord Dufferin, who was Governor-General of Canada, made the citadel his second official residence in 1872. This was the beginning of a long tradition that is ongoing. With his presence inside the fortress, La Citadelle's prestige rose. It was no longer simply a military site but a venue where social events and diplomatic meetings became increasingly frequent. La Citadelle was changing!

In the late 19th century, the daily lives and sanitary conditions of soldiers living in the citadel improved. The casemates were more spacious and comfortable and regimental canteens enabled soldiers to buy various goods at affordable prices.

The citadel's inhabitants integrated themselves into city life. In addition to taking part in many social activities outside the fortress, on numerous occasions, they helped municipal authorities deal with fires, strikes and riots.

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